A Great FanBeat Promo!

We are very proud to be live with the Atlanta Braves, widely recognized as one of the most innovative teams in Major League Baseball. We are seeing great engagement numbers so far – game after game, over 60% of fans that try FanBeat are enjoying it enough to play the entire game (28 questions over 7 innings). […]

We are very proud to be live with the Atlanta Braves, widely recognized as one of the most innovative teams in Major League Baseball. We are seeing great engagement numbers so far – game after game, over 60% of fans that try FanBeat are enjoying it enough to play the entire game (28 questions over 7 innings).

Here’s a really cool promo the Braves ran on BravesVision last week starring HughT, our top performer for the season. Hugh is a real FanBeat pro! We had a nice spike in FanBeat players and MLB.com Ballpark app downloads that night. Let us know what you think. And next time you watch a Braves game, be sure to download the MLB.com Ballpark app and play along on FanBeat.

Braves FanBeat Promotional Interview 2016 from FanBeat on Vimeo.

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Predictive Gaming 2.0

My colleague Brandon Farley first used the phrase “predictive gaming 2.0” as we were preparing for the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics conference last year and brainstorming ways to communicate how FanBeat is different from past efforts to let fans compete to predict game play during live sporting events. The phrase conveys the key message that […]

My colleague Brandon Farley first used the phrase “predictive gaming 2.0” as we were preparing for the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics conference last year and brainstorming ways to communicate how FanBeat is different from past efforts to let fans compete to predict game play during live sporting events. The phrase conveys the key message that while FanBeat is not first, we’ve created a next-generation product that breaks with the past and promises to be a “game-changer” in fan gaming.

Google was not the world’s first search engine. Who remembers AltaVista, Infoseek and Lycos? And Facebook launched after both Friendster and MySpace. We’ve never laid claim to inventing predictive fan gaming, recognizing that other companies have gone before us – with mixed results. So what makes FanBeat different and supports this claim as a next-generation product?

Team-Centric. FanBeat is partnering with teams, leagues and media companies to launch and promote the game. This helps to insure that the FanBeat game complements – not competes – with the live game the fan is enjoying in-venue or via a broadcast.

Flexibility and Variety. FanBeat has a live game producer pushing questions, answers and other game content. The flexibility of the FanBeat platform allows us to work with our partners to tailor the question types, question content, use of imagery, scoring system, prizes and promotions to create an engaging, entertaining and educational game for fans. The engagement metrics for our tests and pilots with college basketball, the NFL and MLB back it up: fans simply love playing FanBeat!

Mobile First. Most past attempts at predictive gaming have been browser-based, the lowest common denominator for running across PCs, laptops and mobile devices. This was not a bad decision at the time, but FanBeat has embraced a mobile-first philosophy and focused on native apps for iOS and Android that integrate seamlessly with our partner mobile apps. This approach has allowed us to deliver a game that is highly responsive and visually pleasing, satisfying a generation of sports fans who enjoy games like Doodle Jump, QuizUp and Color Switch.

Predictive gaming is a term that’s been around a while, however we learned early on that fans really enjoy answering trivia along with predict-the-action questions, so you’re more likely to hear us talk about “live-action gaming” or “real-time gaming” in describing FanBeat. However you categorize it, our focus is on continuing to enhance the platform and the game play to make it more engaging for fans and more valuable to our partners.

Interested in FanBeat for your team? We’d love to hear from you.

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A New Job in the Mobile World

I thought I had the most fun job in the world when I worked as a sports writer right out of college. Then I changed careers and became the world’s very first senior game producer for live-action fan gaming – and my new job has turned into one of the most enjoyable, interactive and engaging […]

I thought I had the most fun job in the world when I worked as a sports writer right out of college.
Then I changed careers and became the world’s very first senior game producer for live-action fan gaming – and my new job has turned into one of the most enjoyable, interactive and engaging ways to make a living I could dream of.
These days, when someone asks me what I do, I usually can’t give them a one-sentence answer like “Oh, I’m an accountant” or “I work for a law firm downtown.” The paragraph-long elevator speech I usually give goes something like, “I work for a startup called FanBeat. We’re a predictive gaming sports app that allows fans to predict the action in real-time while they’re watching an event. Users in our free app get points for correct answers and compete for prizes, while the app is funded through sponsor messages integrated into the app.”
Then the even cooler part.
“My job as the game producer is to watch the game, send real-time questions during breaks that are relevant to the action, then send the answers to questions throughout the course of the game as the play happens on the field.”
The responses that I usually get afterward range from intrigue and wonder to amazement. “Man, that sounds like such a cool job!” I think the only more enthusiastic response I could get is if I told them I was an astronaut.
Much like a sports writer, the job description of a game producer is incredibly fun. The day-to-day responsibilities include processing the story lines before an event, observing the game is it happens, thinking about what’s going to happen next during the event and then summarizing what happened during the game once it’s over.
However, as any sports writer will tell you, while it’s an incredibly fun job, any writer or producer has to pay close attention and watch the game with a more critical perspective. When I’m running a game for FanBeat, I’m constantly taking notes on play-by-play, keeping track of stats, and processing in my head engaging questions to ask during the next break. The mindset that I have as a producer is different than if I’m casually watching a game with friends while drinking beer and eating peanuts.
Again, much like a sports writer, there’s a lot of preparation involved before the game. If a player is really clicking at the plate and riding a 12-game hitting streak, a sports writer usually mentions that tidbit in his game preview or game story. Likewise, one of the first questions I might ask is, “Mallex Smith is riding a 12-game hitting streak. Will he get a hit tonight and extend his streak?”
I also make sure to try and use statistics as background for questions. If Julio Teheran has been dealing on the mound his last couple starts, I’ll make sure to state, “Teheran has a 2.76 ERA in his last 5 games. How many runs will he give up in his first 6 innings?” Conversely, if a pitcher has been scuffling, I’ll reframe the question and say, “Aaron Blair gave up 5 runs in his last appearance and needs to get off to a good start. How many pitches will he throw in the 1st inning?”
I also always like to have trivia questions that are pertinent to the history of the teams. I mix up the trivia so that some of it’s recent and some of it goes back a ways. If the Braves are playing the Cubs, I might ask, “When was the last year the Braves & Cubs met in the playoffs? (hint: the answer’s 2003). Or “which Braves great started his career with the Cubs?” (that one’s Greg Maddux).
On a broader level, trivia questions serve to both entertain and educate users. As a game producer, I always try to mix in humor on a few easier questions. For instance, “In high school, MLB Hall of Famer Tom Glavine was also a standout ______ player” and the answer choices include “A) Squash B) Hockey C) Curling D) Trombone.”
Trivia’s also used as a fan education tool, both in terms of the franchise’s history and the current season. I always like to throw in trivia from the previous night’s game, like who homered, which pitcher got the win, or who got the go-ahead RBI? FanBeat wants to reward the players that are closely following the team night-in and night-out as well as educate the more casual fans. Our feedback has shown that over the course of season, those casual fans become more engaged and dedicated once given the opportunity to learn about their team’s players and history.
Similar to being a sports writer, for a sports fan it’s hard to beat the job description of a game producer. Just like the skillset of a journalist, a game producer must do thorough preparation beforehand, pay close attention to detail during an event, write concisely as well as be able to work under pressure and on deadline. The job is incredibly fun and enjoyable, but at the same time managing a game in real-time can be stressful and challenging.
Don’t get me wrong, though – it sure beats working.

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The Evolution of the Sports Fan

We are in a transformational phase of what it means to be a sports fan. The on-demand, real-time content world in which we now live is changing the fan experience from passive to active with a tide shift from team loyalty to player affection regardless of their employer. The explosive growth of fantasy sports in […]

We are in a transformational phase of what it means to be a sports fan. The on-demand, real-time content world in which we now live is changing the fan experience from passive to active with a tide shift from team loyalty to player affection regardless of their employer. The explosive growth of fantasy sports in the US contributes to this dynamic where individual player performance often trumps the historical emotional fan roller coaster of a team’s run through the regular season and playoffs.

Most would argue that it has never been a better time to be a sports fan. Immediate access to global highlights at most any level of competition; multiple 24×7 sports channels with sport or professional league/college conference focus; analytics at your fingertips to determine the best fantasy draft strategy; and individual athletes leveraging social media to solidify brands that drive viral consumer behavior (see Rickie Fowler flat bills, OBJ receiver gloves, or Bryce Harper arm sleeves).

That said, part of me misses the days of sports fan yore. When I could chuckle as my dad yelled at the radio when rooting on his beloved Idaho Vandals; or the blind faith and loyalty for my Denver Broncos whether it was the Orange Crush defense or the Mile High Salute; or hearing folks talk about the Georgia Bulldogs or Alabama Crimson Tide as the collective “we” when they never attended the schools. An athlete’s tweets, or Snapchats, or Dude Perfect trick shots were never a factor in my opinion of their body of work, since they were members of either “my team” or someone else’s.

It is this somewhat old school mentality that served as the genesis of FanBeat. We see the demands of the sports fan, especially the younger generation, driving a user behavior that requires mobile content in real-time, and the desire to invest in that content. To provide predictive play and team trivia questions during breaks in the action of a live sporting event keeps fans engaged and hopefully begins to swing the loyalty pendulum back to the team, rather than solely to the players’ game stats. Before FanBeat, I could no more get my son to sit down with me to watch the final round of a major. But ask him to predict how many birdies Jordan Spieth might have for a chance to win an Under Armour golf shirt? Now he will pull up a chair.

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Sports, Mobile, Math

Why FanBeat? It’s a question I get asked a lot now. Perhaps the simplest answer is that FanBeat lives at the intersection of three things that I really love. Sports. Mobile Computing. And Math! I’ll break these down. Since I was old enough to say “ball”, I’ve always been a huge sports fan. I enjoy […]

Why FanBeat? It’s a question I get asked a lot now. Perhaps the simplest answer is that FanBeat lives at the intersection of three things that I really love. Sports. Mobile Computing. And Math!

I’ll break these down.

Since I was old enough to say “ball”, I’ve always been a huge sports fan. I enjoy playing sports. I enjoy watching sports. I love the crack of the bat, the swish of the net, the roar of the crowd. As a child, I would listen to the Atlanta Braves on the radio and devote my fall Sunday afternoons and Monday nights to NFL football. As an adult, I’ve been fortunate to enjoy some of the greatest sports venues in the world: Fenway Park, Cameron Indoor Stadium, Wimbledon, Augusta National. To create a product like FanBeat that enhances the enjoyment of sports is a boyhood dream come true.

I’ve been working in the software industry for 25 years. I love the creative process of bringing a new product to market to disrupt an old way of doing business or to create something completely new. Over the past 10 years, mobile computing has put an almost infinite supply of information, entertainment and social connections in the palms of our hands. Just a few years ago, a real-time, media-rich, predict-the-action game like FanBeat would not have been possible. Recent improvements in network capacity, processor speeds, messaging technologies and server infrastructure have all come together to make FanBeat viable. Our technology team has done a brilliant job of creating a game that is both fun to play and that will scale to support millions of simultaneous players on an NFL Sunday afternoon.

I do love math. My father was a college math professor, so I come by it naturally. Part of the appeal of fantasy sports is the wealth of sports statistics available to craft rosters and gain a competitive edge against other players. Fantasy Sports offers the promise, real or imagined, that by “crunching the numbers” you can give yourself a better chance to win. FanBeat is a game of skill that challenges sports fans to crunch the numbers in a different kind of way. You only have 30-60 seconds to read the question, read the answers, consider the variable point values, weigh the risk-reward of different answers, and post your prediction. Take more risk to earn more points and move up the prize board. Use one of your limited double-downs if you’re super-confident in your answer. At the heart of FanBeat is some fun math that rewards those super fans that really know the team and are skilled at predicting the action.

We are focused on partnering with sports teams and media companies to make FanBeat available to sports fans everywhere. Whether you’ve played FanBeat or are interested in FanBeat for your favorite team, we’d love to hear from you.

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